Specific Adaptation To Imposed Demands
Written by Allan Besselink, PT, Dip.MDT   
Monday, 09 April 2007
I was originally exposed to the concept of the SAID Principle, or "Specific Adaptations To Imposed Demands", via exercise physiology. From a cellular perspective, this simply means that the tissues of the body, be they muscle, bone, tendon, cartilage, or ligament - adapt to the demands imposed upon them. For example, weight bearing activities foster an in crease in bone density, and strength training fosters muscular strength and power development. Both are examples of very specific adaptations that the human body makes in order to adapt to the demands placed on the system.

But all cells respond to stimuli. We have known about Pavlov's dog, or "stimulus-response", for years. What we oftentimes forget is that the central nervous system - the world of our thoughts, dreams, creativity, and the like - responds to stimuli in much the same way as muscles do. It makes specific adaptations to the imposed demands - just like any other tissue of the body.

Why do I bring this up here? Because we, as humans, are not "hard-wired". Sure, we are born with genetic materials that define the color of our hair and eyes and other primary characteristics. But from the moment we are conceived, we are constantly adapting to the imposed demands of our world - in utero, and in the world as we know it.

And our central nervous system - that which makes us who we are - undergoes those same types of adaptations.

We are on the planet as dynamic entities. Our bodies virtually recreate themselves as new cells develop and old cells die. Each day is a little different than the one before, and each new day brings new stressors - physical, mental, emotional, spiritual - that challenge us to adapt. We make the best choices we can given whatever we have to work with at any given point in time. We evolve. If we aren't evolving, the species is dying.

And if the species is dying, this is all a moot point anyways.

Remember that every day, you are a slightly different person than the day previous - not to make you feel schizophrenic, but to simply be cognizant that growth and adaptation are in a constant state of flux. Life is dynamic, and change is good. Go forth - and evolve. Today.

{mos_smf_discuss}
Tags:  Thoughts Concepts Mechanisms Principles Training
Last Updated ( Friday, 29 February 2008 )